top of page

Top 10 Interesting C Major Chord That You Should Know

C Major chord is one of the most fundamental and versatile chords in music, and is commonly used in a wide range of musical genres, from classical to pop and rock. Learning how to play different variations of C Major chord can expand your chord vocabulary and add depth to your playing. Here are ten interesting variations of C Major chord that every beginner and intermediate player should know:


  1. C Major 7th (Cmaj7) - This variation adds a seventh note to the basic C Major chord, making it a four-note chord. The 7th note of the C Major scale (B) is added to the C, E, and G notes of the basic chord. To play the Cmaj7 chord, place your fingers on the C, E, G and B notes of the piano or guitar. This chord has a smooth and relaxed sound, and is commonly used in jazz and pop music.

  2. C Major 9th (Cmaj9) - This variation adds the 9th note of the C Major scale (D) to the C Major 7th chord. It creates a full and rich sound that works well in slow and dreamy ballads. To play the Cmaj9 chord, place your fingers on the C, E, G, B, and D notes of the piano or guitar. This chord is often used as a substitute for the C Major chord, as it adds an extra layer of harmonic complexity to the sound.

  3. C Major 6th (C6) - This variation adds the 6th note of the C Major scale (A) to the basic C Major chord. It creates a smoother and more relaxed sound that is commonly used in folk and acoustic music. To play the C6 chord, place your fingers on the C, E, G, and A notes of the piano or guitar. This chord can also be played in an inverted form, with the A note as the lowest note.

  4. C Major 11th (Cmaj11) - This variation adds the 11th note of the C Major scale (F) to the C Major 9th chord. It creates a complex and sophisticated sound that works well in jazz and fusion music. To play the Cmaj11 chord, place your fingers on the C, E, G, B, D, and F notes of the piano or guitar. This chord is often used in chord progressions that require a lot of harmonic variety and sophistication.

  5. C Major Suspended 4th (Csus4) - This variation replaces the third note of the basic C Major chord with the 4th note of the C Major scale (F). It creates a more open and spacious sound that is commonly used in pop and rock music. To play the Csus4 chord, place your fingers on the C, F, and G notes of the piano or guitar. This chord is often used as an alternative to the C Major chord, as it creates a different feel and sound.

  6. C Major Add 9 (Cadd9) - This variation adds the 9th note of the C Major scale (D) to the basic C Major chord. It creates a bright and cheerful sound that is commonly used in folk and country music. To play the Cadd9 chord, place your fingers on the C, E, G, and D notes of the piano or guitar. This chord is often used in chord progressions that need a brighter and more upbeat feel.

  7. C Major Augmented (Caug) - This variation sharpens the fifth note of the basic C Major chord. It creates a tense and dramatic sound that is commonly used in rock and metal music. To play the Caug chord, place your fingers on the C, E, and G# notes of the piano or guitar. This chord is often used in chord progressions that require a lot of tension and drama, as it creates a sense of instability and unease.

  8. C Major Flat 5 (C♭5) - This variation flattens the fifth note of the basic C Major chord. It creates a dark and heavy sound that is commonly used in blues and jazz music. To play the C♭5 chord, place your fingers on the C, E, and G♭ notes of the piano or guitar. This chord is often used in chord progressions that require a lot of depth and emotion, as it creates a sense of sadness and melancholy.

  9. C Major 7th Flat 5 (C7♭5) - This variation combines the 7th and ♭5 notes of the C Major scale, creating a unique and dissonant sound. It is commonly used in blues and jazz music, as well as in fusion and experimental genres. To play the C7♭5 chord, place your fingers on the C, E, G♭, and B notes of the piano or guitar. This chord is often used in chord progressions that require a lot of tension and dissonance, as it creates a sense of instability and unease.

  10. C Major 6/9 (C6/9) - This variation adds the 9th note and 6th note of the C Major scale to the basic C Major chord. It creates a warm and harmonious sound that is commonly used in jazz and pop music. To play the C6/9 chord, place your fingers on the C, E, G, A, and D notes of the piano or guitar. This chord is often used in chord progressions that require a lot of harmonic complexity, as it creates a sense of depth and richness.

These ten variations of C Major chord provide a wealth of options for adding depth and interest to your playing. Experiment with different combinations and see what works best for the music you are playing. With time and practice, you'll be able to confidently incorporate these chords into your playing and create a more dynamic and versatile sound.


In conclusion, learning to play these 10 interesting C Major chord variations can greatly enhance your ability to express yourself through music. Whether you're a beginner or an experienced musician, incorporating these chords into your playing can add new dimensions to your sound and help you communicate your musical ideas more effectively.

Related Posts

Music is like magic. It can make you feel things, tell stories, and connect people from all over the world. But did you know that music has its own special language called "music theory"? For beginner

Post: Blog2_Post
bottom of page